Crossroads: Change in Rural America is coming to Georgia
Six sites have been selected to host this Smithsonian exhibition from August 2019 through June 2020. Congratulations to the communities!
Explore Georgia’s State Art Collection,
now featured on the New Georgia Encyclopedia.
From St. Simons Island to Gainesville,
Georgia Humanities grant program impacts communities statewide.
Congratulations to the 2018 recipients
of the Governor's Awards for the Arts & Humanities!

PROGRAM SPOTLIGHT

National History Day

The aim of National History Day is to encourage middle and high school students to engage more deeply in the historical process, through research and presentation of that research along with analysis.

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TWITTER
  • RT  @tellusmuseum : ***UPDATE: This discount is also extended to include Alabama evacuees.*** Hurricane Michael evacuees from Georgia and Flo… 2 weeks ago
  • RT  @amhistorymuseum : Today in 2002: President Jimmy Carter wins Nobel Peace Prize. Learn how a solar panel from Carter's White House came t… 2 weeks ago
  • RT  @2DayInGAHistory : #ThisDayInGAHistory 2002 Former president Jimmy Carter became the 2nd Georgian (Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was the 1st… 2 weeks ago
  • To Georgians with archives/museums with damaged collections, call National Heritage Responders: 202-661-8068. Conta… https://t.co/OAEcX3RMbl 2 weeks ago

The “forever” of Flannery O’Connor

The art of Georgia writer Flannery O’Connor lies in her ability to condense the heaviest of thoughts about life and purpose into the commonplace of stories.

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The slave dwelling project

The 21st-century idea of sleeping in a slave cabin from the antebellum era is at first challenging to the mind and the memory. What’s the point? Who would choose to do this? But this is exactly what Joseph McGill Jr., the founder of the Slave Dwelling Project, does.

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An award for all mankind, a dinner for one—the Atlanta Nobel Prize party for MLK, given by the city’s image-conscious white leadership

On October 14, 1964, the Nobel Committee announced that thirty-five-year-old Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. had been awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

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The Georgia roots of one of the 20th century’s most successful songwriters

Music- and film-making are thriving businesses in Georgia now, but Georgia native Johnny Mercer—writer of such memorable songs as “Glow-Worm” and “Jeepers Creepers,” which were wildly popular in their day—successfully blended both during his long career.

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